Education and Enterprise – FAQs

General FAQs

  • Who is in the overall Campus partnership?

    Richmond upon Thames College, Haymarket Media Group, Clarendon School, Harlequins, Waldegrave School, Achieving for Children and Richmond Council. The partnership is not a formal entity, but each organisation has committed to working together to deliver the Education and Enterprise Campus.

    The subscribing members of the Richmond upon Thames College Free School Trust (the Academy Trust behind the proposed secondary school, The Richmond upon Thames School) are Richmond upon Thames College, Harlequins, Haymarket, Waldegrave School, Achieving for Children and Richmond Council.

  • What are the timescales for the development?

    The timeframes may be subject to change, but for the expected timeframe click here.

  • How can I have my say about the proposals?

    There will be a number of opportunities for residents, parents, students and staff at the College, Haymarket, Harlequins and Clarendon School to have their say about the proposals.
Four pre-planning consultations have already been held regarding the Campus, with drop-in sessions and online surveys. To see the consultation material and the results please click here.

  • Who is paying for the new Campus to be built?

    The scale of the proposals mean that multiple funding sources will be needed. The principal funding streams are:

    1) Government Grants.

    In June 2014 the Department for Education gave conditional approval to open the proposed new secondary school – The Richmond upon Thames School (RTS). In early 2015 the College received funding approval from the London Enterprise Panel (LEP) for the first phase of its redevelopment and has now had funding confirmed by the LEP for its second phase, the STEM centre.

    2) Sale of some of Richmond upon Thames College’s land to enable the development. Proposals for an ‘enabling development’ are part of the planning policy for the site. Haymarket is proposing to purchase part of the land and fund the build of its new tech hub through its own resources.

    3) Council funding for The Richmond upon Thames School (RTS) and Clarendon School. In November 2014 the Council agreed to purchase land from the College for the two schools (the Education Funding Agency, sponsored by the Department for Education, will fund the build of the new secondary school subject to the Richmond upon Thames College Free School Trust meeting pre-opening criteria).

  • How many people will be on the Campus once the redevelopment is complete?
    • Circa 3,000 day time, full-time, Richmond upon Thames College students and around 450 staff. The College will continue with evening and weekend courses. Currently approximately 300 learners access the site in the evenings over two nights with a smaller number on a Saturday. The proposal for the new Campus is that it will be accessible on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday evenings until 10pm and on Saturdays from 10am until 5pm. This proposal increases the access by one evening in comparison to current operations.
    • 750 The Richmond upon Thames School (RTS) students and around 90 staff (when the school reaches capacity in September 2021)
    • 115 Clarendon School students and around 60 staff
    • 20 Haymarket Media Group staff
  • Why is Haymarket not moving their global HQ to the site?

    Haymarket’s plans for the Campus were in the early stages and its thinking has evolved. The company will therefore create the Haymarket tech hub on the College site rather than their global HQ. This revision to the site plans will lead to a reduction in the intensity of the development of the site which is an issue for the local community.

  • Why does Haymarket want to put their new tech hub on the Campus?

    Haymarket has been in the borough for 35 years and has a strong track-record of working with schools, colleges and universities locally and nationally. It has recently launched the Haymarket Skills Academy which will enable students at the College to access, through the Academy, the tech hub’s industry standard technology and work with established professionals who will be on hand to provide “master classes” and help shape curriculum content.

  • How will good citizenship on the part of pupils translate into the relationship of the schools, the College and Haymarket with the local community?

    All five of the institutions will be seeking to ensure they play an important role in providing or enhancing the opportunities that are available to local residents, and to young people in particular. We expect the pupils and students on the Campus to engage positively with the local community in as many ways as possible. It is our intention to build excellent relationships between all the institutions on the Campus and local residents, to ensure that this development is seen as a significant local facility that brings benefit to those beyond its immediate boundaries.

  • What changes to the proposals, other than the addition of Haymarket’s tech hub, have been made since the public consultation in early 2013?

    There have been no other significant physical changes to the proposal. As a neighbour to the site, Harlequins has agreed to be a partner in the working up of the development proposals and to be a part of the Richmond upon Thames College Free School Trust.

  • Are there plans to build on the Council depot?

    The Education and Enterprise Campus proposals that are being developed do not include changes to the Council depot.

  • What are the proposals for the Craneford Way playing fields and how will the impact on the local community be mitigated?

    The College-owned playing fields on Craneford Way East will be retained and enhanced to facilitate improved year-round sport provision, including all-weather playing surfaces for football and rugby. Development will be in accordance with national and local guidance, consistent with the site’s designation as Metropolitan Open Land and with appropriate consideration of the local ecology.

  • Will there still be public access to the Craneford Way playing fields?

    The public will have access to Craneford Way East’s improved year-round sport provision, including all-weather sports pitches, as part of the College’s community offer. However, access will have to be managed to ensure that both the College’s and public’s needs are met and the new facilities are maintained to the standard required. In addition, following feedback from residents, the proposed layout of the all-weather sports pitches now provides potential space for dog walking and informal recreational activity.

    The Craneford Way West playing fields are classified as Metropolitan Open Lane and will not form part of the Education and Enterprise Campus development.

  • Will the existing play area on Craneford Way be improved as part of the development?

    This play area will not be part of the Education and Enterprise Campus development. However, improvements to the playground are likely, funded by the Council through the Environment Directorate’s budgets.

Education FAQs

  • Who is the Free School for and when would it open?

    The new secondary school, The Richmond upon Thames School (RTS), will cater for children of any background and children would mainly be admitted on the basis of proximity to the school. The school will open in September 2017.

  • What is a Free School?

    Free Schools are state funded schools, independent of local authorities. Anyone can apply to set them up without waiting for permission from local authorities or other schools. For more information about Free Schools, refer to the Department for Education’s website.

    An Academy Trust (The Richmond upon Thames College Free School Trust) made up of the College, Harlequins, Haymarket, Waldegrave School, Achieving for Children and Richmond Council has been established to propose the new school.

  • Why do we need a new secondary school?

    Although the Council’s pupil forecasts indicate that there would be enough local secondary school places in the borough over the short to medium term, it is predicted that by 2017 capacity would be exceeded unless additional places are provided.

    This forecast is evidenced by the significant increase in demand for local state primary school places over recent years,  which has required building development to expand many of the local primary schools. 17 of the 27 extra forms of entry that have been enabled since 2000 are on the Twickenham side of the river.

    Each of the schools (Chase Bridge, Orleans/St Stephen’s, St Mary’s and Trafalgar) within a short distance of the College site has been expanded by one form of entry.

  • Will it have a sixth form?

    No – the school will link directly to the College for its sixth form provision.

  • Why will the School be a Free School?

    The Free School model offers the ideal route for enabling an innovative collaboration between the partners. Local parents have shown great support for the Free School proposal and the Free School model is the best way of securing the necessary funding.

  • Will it be a faith school?

    No – admissions will mostly be based on distance from home to the school.

  • What will the admissions criteria be?

    The school’s admissions criteria will be the same as for Richmond’s community schools. Preference for places will be given to ‘Looked After Children’, siblings and cases of exceptional family, social or medical need. The remaining places will be allocated using a home-school distance criterion.

  • Who will run the schools?

    Clarendon School will remain separately led and governed by its leadership team and governing body. The existing close working relationship with the College’s leadership team will continue, and co-location of the new provision would further enhance outcomes for its pupils. The new secondary school, The Richmond upon Thames School (RTS), will be operated by the Richmond upon Thames College Free School Trust, made up of the College, Harlequins, Haymarket, Waldegrave School, Achieving for Children and Richmond Council.

  • Will there be changes to the College curriculum?

    Yes – this is currently being planned and developed.

  • Why is the co-location of Clarendon School being considered as a part of these proposals?

    Clarendon’s current buildings have outlived their original lifespan, are increasingly expensive to maintain and are not appropriate for delivering a broad and engaging curriculum to the current cohort of pupils (all of whom have learning difficulties and additional complex needs, including autism). Under these proposals, these vulnerable pupils would benefit from a more centrally located site, reducing journey times and with improved access for independent travel.

    The building would be specifically designed for pupils with special educational needs, allowing better access and providing flexible yet specialist spaces for the delivery of the curriculum. Co-location with the new secondary school provision would provide pupils in both schools with many more opportunities for inclusion, whilst being on the same site as Richmond upon Thames College would enable an easier transition for pupils to post-16 education. All three institutions would benefit from having some shared facilities and from the concentration of a very wide range of expertise on site.
It should be noted that these proposals relate only to Clarendon’s secondary age pupils (KS3 and 4).

  • Why are Haymarket involved?

    There are many benefits to Haymarket, including:

    • The opportunity to have input into curriculum development to ensure the College’s vocational courses are up-to-date and relevant
    • Insight from young people
    • Stronger research and development through exposure to developing trends
    • A higher calibre of trainees for work placements and apprenticeships
    • College graduates with exposure to an enterprise culture that will provide an extra dimension to their education experience
    • Well-educated, trained and qualified young people who can contribute well as employees
    • Enduring corporate and social responsibility by working with the schools and the College.
  • Why are Harlequins involved?

    Harlequins believes strongly in being a leader in the community and the club wants to use its extensive skills to help, discover and develop the community’s talented students who could work with the club.

    Harlequins is truly inspired by the Campus idea and the synergies between the club’s Foundation and the Campus are obvious when it comes to promoting sport. The club believes that if you want something to change and be a success you have to be in it for the long-term and that is why they have taken the decision to become a subscribing member of the Richmond upon Thames College Free School Trust.

  • Will Turing House be in competition with the Free School on the Richmond College site?

    We believe that by September 2017, there will be enough local children transferring into Year Six to fill Turing House and all the current schools, so another secondary school based on the College site would meet the need for additional places at that point.

  • What in outline is the curriculum for The Richmond upon Thames School and when will the prospectus be published?

    The vision for the curriculum for the school is based on the solid foundations of the National Curriculum. This will be enhanced through collaboration with the school’s partners. Enterprise will play a key part and students will benefit from a programme of visiting lecturers, seminars and workshops organised and delivered by members of the Free School Trust, their clients and partners.

    The use of digital technologies will be commonplace and young people will be equipped with the skills to operate confidently and efficiently in a connected world. Haymarket will help develop the curriculum in these areas and through the Haymarket Skills Academy will provide access to the on-site, tech hub’s state of the art facilities.

    The school’s links with Harlequins and the College will also provide pupils with access to a very wide range of exercise, fitness and sporting activities, events and facilities. A significant amount of curriculum time will be devoted to physical activity which will be tailored to be accessible to all learners.

    The school’s prospectus will be published later this year.

  • What will The Richmond upon Thames School policy be on recruiting teachers especially in relation to formal, professional teaching qualifications?

    We don’t have these details at this early stage but we have no plans to appoint non-qualified teachers.

  • Will there be specific boundaries around the schools and College to ensure safety?

    The Campus will support the pooling of requirements and facilities to enable enhanced educational opportunities while offering a safe and comfortable environment for students and pupils. Safety will be paramount and there will be separate entrances for each of the educational establishments and the provision of appropriate internal boundaries.

Campus FAQs

  • Will the College, schools and Haymarket share facilities?

    Yes – as part of the scoping and initial site design work, the partners will explore whether some facilities may be shared on the Campus.

    The Haymarket tech hub will be accessible to students through the Haymarket Skills Academy.  This will give students access to industry standard technology and the opportunity to work with established professionals who will be on hand to provide “master classes” and help shape curriculum content. The Haymarket Skills Academy will also deliver work experience placements and apprenticeships.

  • Are you proposing to develop on the open space on Craneford Way?

    Not for buildings, no. This land has a planning designation of Metropolitan Open Land (MOL). MOL has a planning policy presumption against inappropriate development and gives it a similar level of protection as the green belt. Essential facilities for appropriate uses may be considered but that must not have an adverse impact on the openness of MOL. The current proposal is that the College-owned playing fields on Craneford Way East will be retained and enhanced to facilitate improved year-round sport provision, including all-weather playing surfaces for football and rugby. All proposals are expected to align with the MOL policy and do not include either educational or residential buildings on this land.

  • How many people will be on the Campus once the redevelopment is complete?
    • Circa 3,000 day time, full-time, Richmond upon Thames College students and around 450 staff. The College will continue with evening and weekend courses. Currently approximately 300 learners access the site in the evenings over two nights with a smaller number on a Saturday. The proposal for the new Campus is that it will be accessible on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday evenings until 10pm and on Saturdays from 10am until 5pm. This proposal increases the access by one evening in comparison to current operations.
    • 750 The Richmond upon Thames School (RTS) students and around 90 staff (when the school reaches capacity in September 2021)
    • 115 Clarendon School students and around 60 staff
    • 20 Haymarket Media Group staff

Traffic / Transport / Access FAQs

  • How is the partnership gauging the impact of traffic on the local area?

    An Environmental Impact Assessment of the site has been carried out to inform planning applications; that assessment has included consultations and agreements with relevant parties, including Transport for London, and an appraisal of the likely impact of traffic on the local area.

  • What are the plans for the River Crane footpath link?

    The long-planned footpath along the River Crane will be realised in a parallel project, funded predominantly by the scheme at the former Royal Mail sorting office site. This will provide a more direct connection to Twickenham railway station and offer a new approach to the site from the southwest.

  • What consideration is being made for cyclists travelling to and from the site? (e.g. green travel plans / cycle  racks / cycle paths etc)

    Each element of the development will include facilities for cyclists, such as parking, and measures to encourage cycling will be included in the partner organisations’ travel plans. Improvements for cyclists are expected to include the upgrading of Marsh Farm Lane (adjoining the western boundary of the College site) to enable better pedestrian and cycle access.

  • What are the plans for introducing a new right hand turn out of the site onto the A316?

    A right hand turn out of Langhorn Drive has been approved within the Outline Planning Application. In addition, it is proposed that the new residential site links to Langhorn Drive, rather than into the surrounding residential estate.

  • Will there be increased public transport e.g. bus routes, serving the area?

    The site is well served by existing public transport routes and there are no plans to increase these. The traffic impact assessment has included consultations with relevant parties, including Transport for London, and an appraisal of the likely transport requirements.

  • How will the partnership ensure that the pedestrian routes are used?

    The site has been planned to make access to the Campus by the pedestrian routes an attractive choice. The long-planned footpath (a parallel scheme, funded by others) along the River Crane will provide a more direct connection to Twickenham railway station and offer a new approach to the site from the southwest. Also, it is expected that the upgrading of Marsh Farm Lane (adjoining the western boundary of the College site) will enable better pedestrian access. Additionally, the location of the buildings at the northern end of the site will favour increased pedestrian access from the North and West. The Campus will be organised to provide separate vehicular and pedestrian access.

  • How will the users of the Campus access the site by car and on foot?

    The site currently has a number of vehicular and pedestrian access points which link the College with the transport network and existing Public Rights of Way. The provision of well-planned links would be a priority for any future development. For example, the College would wish to incorporate enhancements to pedestrian and cycle access to the site e.g. from the East side via the new intended cycle/footpath link alongside the River Crane, between Twickenham Station and the existing North/South path and through a new dedicated access along the western boundary (shared with Harlequins).

    This could provide a benefit in reducing the number of students electing to use the existing residential roads to access the College from the railway station.

    The majority of vehicular traffic for the College and the schools would access the site from the A316. There is a planning condition to complete a controlled parking zone study. The numbers of traffic movements and parking spaces for both the education and residential sites would be considered prior to a planning application.

  • Will there be parking on the site for the schools, College and Haymarket?

    Yes – the parking for the Haymarket tech hub and parking for the College would be accessed from the A316 via Langhorn Drive; the new secondary school staff parking would be accessed from the A316 via the top end of Egerton Road; Clarendon School would have car parking off Egerton Road. All designs will be subject to planning permission.

Residential development FAQs